Here I Am to Worship!

In preparation for our Old Testament Survey class, I have read pages 266 to 291 of Reading the Old Testament by Rev. Fr. Lawrence Boadt, C.S.P. This chapter discusses Israelite worship and prayer, particularly the nature of the book of Psalms. The author described the development of Israelite worship beginning with the book of Genesis to the time of King David. He then compared the same to the different methods of worship of the pagans surrounding the land of Canaan with special emphasis on their respective holy places, which, for the Jews, culminated in the temple built by Solomon. Attention was likewise given to the major types of sacrifices found in the book of Leviticus and the various feast days observed by the Jews as commanded by God through Moses.

The second part of this chapter dealt with the Psalms and Israel’s prayer life. According to Fr. Boadt, the Psalms seemed to be grouped in small collections, namely: (1) Davidic hymns; (2) northern collection of hymns; (3) collection from temple singers; (4) psalms from a royal collection; and (5) a second and expanded Davidic royal collection. He noted that each of these divisions is marked by a special prayer and blessing of praise. Moreover, the Psalms are further made up of different literary genres such as praise, thanksgiving, individual laments, community laments, liturgical, wisdom, trust songs, royal psalms of the king, Zion hymns, and royal psalms of Yahweh as King. Aside from these, there also some psalms for special occasions like weddings, victories, and personal piety.

Reading the Psalms can truly be a source of blessing and inspiration as it gives us an idea on how the ancient Israelites approached God in prayer and worship. Likewise, we can use it today in our own respective church services or personal prayers. It shows us that we can indeed approach God with both our triumphs and pain, in short, God receives and meets us in whatever circumstances we may be in. May the Lord be praised forever!

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