The Counselor

One of the most important elements of counseling is the counselor himself and according to Adams in his The Christian Counselor’s Manual, “While every Christian must become a counselor to his fellow Christians, the work of counseling as a special calling is assigned particularly to the pastor.”

Corollary to this is his apparent antagonism towards the “science” of psychiatry, positing that biblically, there is no warrant for acknowledging its existence as a separate and distinct discipline because there are only three specified sources of personal problems in living, namely: demonic activity, personal sin, and organic illness, and that all options are covered under these three heads, leaving no room for a fourth—non-organic mental illness. So, there is therefore no place in a biblical scheme for the psychiatrist as a separate practitioner. The same is true with respect to his view on non-directive counseling saying that those words represent a contradiction of terms.

As ordained Christian ministers are the ones specifically tasked to do the work of counseling, the qualifications of a counselor are the same as those of a minister. To be an effective nouthetic counselor, one must possess the following: (a) adequate scriptural knowledge of the will of God; (b) divine wisdom in one’s relationships to others; and (c) good will and concern for other members of the body of Christ. In short, he must be convinced that the Bible is true and be ready and able to direct others to its promises with assurance and conviction. The counselor, as an ordained man of God, exercises the full authority for counseling that Christ gave to the organized church. As such, he must also exhibit faithful obedience to God’s Word in his daily life.

Aside from the qualifications discussed above, the emotional health and attitudes of the counselor are likewise vitally important. A person who is undergoing emotional turmoil due to his own personal problems may not be in the best condition to counsel others. He will be out of focus, distracted by his own issues that he would not be able to listen attentively and effectively process the information his counselee is sharing. Moreover, the emotionally disturbed counselor’s judgment might become clouded and colored by his own biases and desired solutions to his own problems.

As the person primarily responsible in helping other people deal with their life problems and issues, the minister must see to it that before he enters the counseling room or office and meets with his counselees, his emotional and mental disposition is well-balanced and free from any distractions that may affect his performance and functions as such. To help achieve this, the help and guidance of the Holy Spirit is indispensable, which can be gained through prayer and meditation on God’s Word.

The Counselee

In reading chapter four of The Christian Counselor’s Manual by Adams, I found some important things that a Christian counselor needs to know and realize before he proceeds with the counseling proper.

The first is that as Christians who regularly read and meditate on God’s Word, we already know a lot about human nature. Even in the study of theology in seminary where the Bible is our primary and only infallible source of truth, the topic of anthropology is included. As the Bible contains the truths of God relative to His creation, coupled with intense observation of verbal and non-verbal messages put across by our counselee, we are able to effectively diagnose the main problems that commonly beset man. According to Adams, there are three sources of information available to the Christian or pastoral counselor with the first one being primary and foundational and the other two secondary and derivative, to wit: (1) the Scriptures, as mentioned above; (2) the counselor’s and others’ experiences; and (3) the dynamics of his own sinful heart. While the first source is inerrant and infallible being the Word of God, the interpretations of the second and third sources are subject to the first.

The second thing that pastoral counselors need to remember is that the Bible contains every solution to every human problem. Of course, this does not mean that it contains the solutions to every mathematical or scientific problem but that which relates to the nature of man in relation to his God. In other words, those relating to faith and morals. In fact, these are the only kinds of issues that truly have eternal significance. Jesus, being both fully God and fully human, knows and understands all the problems, difficulties, and temptations that all men face. As a man, he himself faced the same temptations and yet did not sin.

Third, in view of the foregoing, we also need to know how to properly apply the truths of Scripture to the issues of our counselees. We can do this by going through our counselee’s history so as to correctly understand his or her situation well. Otherwise, our diagnosis of the real problem may be faulty or at best, incomplete. We have to learn how to listen carefully with patient endurance guided by the Holy Spirit and the truths of Scripture in interpreting the signs.

Fourth and last, we have to take confidence that our counselees can indeed change. This is a very crucial plank in the Christian counselor’s platform. Even though modern psychologists and psychiatrists seem to have given up on a seemingly “mental” patient, we, as Christian counselors should not give up easily but instead see the root cause of the problem as it relates to our sinful nature which is not beyond the redemptive powers of the Blood of Christ. The idea itself of being “born again” signifies a radical change in our being. It not only illustrates a cleansing or repairs of a certain person but a total change of that person’s nature. Everywhere the Scriptures either demand change or assume its possibility. Knowing such truth gives the Christian counselor hope that his labor shall bear fruit because he knows that God is in the business of changing lives.